Wimbledon Betting Guide: Odds For the 2022 Tennis Tournament

Odds, Analysis, And How To Bet

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View Wimbledon odds in our odds comparison table below. Wimbledon 2022 takes place in London as the third major this year and is the only major that is played on grass courts. On this page, we will highlight the ways to bet on Wimbledon and provide analysis on doing so.

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Wimbledon odds

Here are men’s and women’s Wimbledon betting odds for the 2022 tournament.

Wimbledon Odds: Men's
Wimbledon Odds: Women's

Novak Djokovic
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-175
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-155
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-225
Rafael Nadal
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+500
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+400
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+400
Carlos Alcaraz Garfia
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+1400
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+1200
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+1000
Stefanos Tsitsipas
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+1500
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+1400
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+1100
Nick Kyrgios
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+2000
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+1800
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+1600
Taylor Fritz
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+4000
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+3300
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+3500
John Isner
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+5000
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+5000
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+5000
Cameron Norrie
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+5000
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+6600
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+4000
Ugo Humbert
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+6500
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+10000
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+8000
Alex de Minaur
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+6500
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+5000
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+5000

Iga Swiatek
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+140
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+135
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+125
Ons Jabeur
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+500
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+450
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+450
Jelena Ostapenko
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+1100
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+900
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+1000
Cori Gauff
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+1100
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+1200
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+1000
Simona Halep
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+1100
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+1000
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+900
Petra Kvitova
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+1100
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+1100
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+1100
Maria Sakkari
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+1600
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+1600
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+1600
Angelique Kerber
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+2000
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+2000
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+1600
Elena Rybakina
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+3500
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+4000
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+2500
Caroline Garcia
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+4000
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+4000
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+4000

Novak Djokovic (-120): With three straight Wimbledon wins and six overall, it’s no surprise that Djokovic is the heavy favorite in England. He didn’t have much of a warmup since the French Open, but it’s hard to see how Djokovic won’t be in the final for a fourth consecutive cup.

Matteo Berrettini (+650): Last year’s runner-up against Djokovic has simply gotten ready for another deep run with back-to-back grass-court wins at Stuttgart and Queen’s Club. He took out some solid competition in both victories and has to feel confident in getting back to the final with a decent draw.

Rafael Nadal (+750): Nadal will look to go three-for-three in Grand Slams this year at a place he hasn’t played since 2019. He made the semis in both ’18 and ’19, but he hasn’t made a final at the All England Club since 2011 – a year after he won his second Wimbledon title. It’s hard to count out Nadal this year but winning on grass again could be his biggest challenge yet.

Carlos Alcaraz (+950): Another player who has elected to take a rest since the French Open outside of a couple of matches at Hurlingham, Alcaraz has played Wimbledon just once and was eliminated in the second round last year. This will be a big tournament for the young Spaniard as he tries to cement himself as a threat on every surface.

Hubert Hurkacz (+1500): Hurkacz opened some eyes in Halle with an impressive grass-court tournament win while knocking off Daniil Medvedev and Felix Auger-Aliassime among others. That shouldn’t come as much of a surprise after he made it to the semis last year before losing to Berrettini. I think it’s fair to say he’s one of the biggest threats to Djokovic if they line up in the draw.

Felix Auger-Aliassime (+1700): The Canadian has started to make his mark in majors as his fourth-round exit at the French Open was tied for his worst performance since the 2020 French Open. A quarterfinal run last year at Wimbledon was Auger-Aliassime’s best at a Grand Slam at the time, and he’s had a solid little grass run coming in.

Nick Kyrgios (+2000): The polarizing Kyrgios has only made two quarterfinals at Grand Slams, one of them coming at Wimbledon in 2014. He has a sneaky good record on grass and was really rounding into form with some impressive wins going into Wimbledon before having to withdraw from Mallorca due to pain in his abdomen. If everything is okay, Kyrgios could be a factor at the All England Club.

Marin Cilic (+2500): Cilic was one of the top threats at Wimbledon from 2014-17 when he made three quarterfinals and a final. It was Federer who took out Cilic in 2017 for the trophy, and the Croatian has struggled here since with nothing better than a third-round appearance last year. He had a decent warmup by making it to the semis at Queen’s Club in mid-June.

Stefanos Tsitsipas (+3500): Grass is simply not Tsitsipas’ surface as evidenced by three first-round exits in four tries at Wimbledon. He did make it to the fourth round in 2018, but a pair of second-round losses in Stuttgart and Halle leading into the tournament doesn’t allow much confidence in Tsitsipas figuring it out at Wimbledon this year.

Andy Murray (+6500): You’d have to imagine Wimbledon is the one Grand Slam left that Murray may believe he can win. The two-time winner here advanced to the third round last year in his comeback, and he’s started to open some eyes for a run this year with an impressive grass warmup in Surbiton and Stuttgart. Murray had multiple strong wins in those efforts and gave Berrettini all he could handle in the final in Germany. Any type of deep run would be an incredible scene at the All England Club.

Iga Swiatek (+140): In her second Wimbledon, Swiatek made it to the fourth round in 2021 to show some life at the Grand Slam she had the least success at. This is still a poor number in my opinion despite her incredible win streak dating back to Dubai in February. Grass has by far been Swiatek’s worst surface, and no warmup tournaments combined with an exhibition loss to Simona Halep on grass has me doubting she’ll be able to extend this run.

Coco Gauff (+1000): Wimbledon was the home of Gauff’s insane fourth-round run back in 2019, and she followed up with another fourth-round exit in her second try last year. Like Swiatek, Gauff seems to be most comfortable on clay at this point. But a solid semis run in Berlin including a nice win over Karolina Pliskova should have her hopeful she can improve her play on grass.

Ons Jabeur (+1100): Jabeur was the woman who eventually won that grass event in Berlin, and it’s jumped her up to third in the world going into the Grand Slam she’s had recent success at. The quarterfinal loss last year at the All England Club tied her deepest run at a major, and I’d imagine she’s confident coming in with a field that has no real clear favorite in my opinion. Keep an eye on a knee injury she suffered in Eastbourne.

Simona Halep (+1200): The 2019 Wimbledon winner hasn’t been able to play again at the All England Club since her victory, but she comes in with some intriguing form. Despite being ranked just 19th, we know Halep can get it done on grass. She beat Serena Williams and Swiatek in an exhibition along with making the semis in a warmup in Birmingham. I wouldn’t be surprised with a deep run.

Serena Williams (+1600): Williams will make her first appearance in a singles match since she had to retire from the first round of last year’s Wimbledon tournament. She did appear in good form when playing doubles with Jabeur in Eastbourne, but her partner unfortunately had to retire with a small knee tweak. She’s always a threat at Wimbledon, but it’d be surprising for Williams to come out on top after this much time off.

Beatriz Haddad Maia (+2000): The Brazilian has come out of nowhere to win her first two WTA singles finals in Nottingham and Birmingham to open June on grass courts. That clearly gives Maia the most impressive form heading into Wimbledon and suddenly makes her a favorite despite never making it past the second round at a Grand Slam. It’s a risky play but you can’t ignore the names she’s taken out on grass the last few weeks.

Maria Sakkari (+2200): Wimbledon has been the worst major for the World No. 5, but a couple decent warmup events coming in shows that Sakkari could still be a threat this week. She’s never advanced past the third round here, and her past record on grass isn’t overly positive for a number this low. I’d be surprised to see much more than a quarterfinal run for Sakkari.

Belinda Bencic (+2500): Bencic is unfortunately another player who has some injury concerns coming into Wimbledon after she had to retire from the final in Berlin against Jabeur. If all is well, Bencic is an interesting option this week with intriguing form and a couple of fourth-round runs at Wimbledon in the past.

Amanda Anisimova (+2500): Anisimova finally got back in action at the Homburg Open and made a decent run to the quarters before losing to Halep. The young American has made it to the fourth round in both Grad Slams this year, but she has a ton to prove on grass still, along with trying to get out of the second round for the first time at Wimbledon.

Garbine Muguruza (+2500): It’s been a rough year for the 2017 Wimbledon champion as she’s won just three matches dating all the way back to Indian Wells in early March. That includes a quick exit on grass in Eastbourne along with a first-round loss in Berlin to No. 59 ranked Andrea Petkovic. The Spaniard has a great record overall on grass, but Muguruza will need to quickly find some form out of nowhere to really have a chance for this Grand Slam.

Wimbledon: Key dates

  • First Round: June 27
  • Second Round: June 29
  • Third Round: July 1
  • Fourth Round: July 3
  • Quarterfinals: July 5
  • Women’s Semifinals: July 7
  • Men’s Semifinals: July 8
  • Women’s Final: July 9
  • Men’s Final: July 10

How to bet on Wimbledon

Betting on Wimbledon is easy and there are a variety of options at top legal US sportsbooks. Check out the welcome offers from the top books like DraftKings Sportsbook and FanDuel Sportsbook below and click on the promo banner to sign up now.

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What are tennis futures bets?

Tennis futures bets are odds available to bet on for tennis tournaments that haven’t started yet. Most sportsbooks have futures odds for all four majors for the majority of the year. Sportsbooks also have odds for other ATP and WTA tournaments a few days leading up to their start. For example, you could currently bet $10 on Serena Williams to win Wimbledon and would win $120 dollars if she came out on top with her +1200 odds at Caesars. Placing a bet on multiple players you think could win can still be profitable depending on the stakes due to higher odds than traditional betting.

Other ways to bet on Wimbledon

Moneyline: The majority of bets in tennis are moneyline wagers. Betting on the moneyline during Wimbledon means you bet on a player straight up in his or her 1v1 match. There are no ties in tennis, so there will always be a definite winner. Oddsmakers will determine who is the favorite (-) and who is the underdog (+) based on the strengths and weaknesses of each opponent.

Game spread: Betting on the game spread means betting on a player to cover his or her spread in the match with total number of games won. For example, say Alexander Zverev (+4.5) played Novak Djokovic. Zverev could lose the match (6-7, 6-7, 4-6) in straight sets but still win the bet because he only lost by four total games.

Set Spread: Betting on set spreads is the same concept as game spreads but a little simpler to track. Spreads will be set at 1.5 — or 2.5 in bigger mismatches. If Djokovic was at (-1.5) in his matchup against Nick Kyrgios, for example, he would need to win the match in no more than four total sets to fulfill the bet.

Over/under (total games): Betting on over/under means placing a wager on the length of the match itself instead of who wins. The over/under line can vary widely based on who is playing and how evenly matched the tennis match is expected to be. For example, an evenly matched championship expected to go five sets would have a much higher over/under game total. A first-round match that is more than likely expected to be a 3-0 sweep could have an over/under of games played in the low 20s.

Props: Tennis props allow you to wager on something that may or may not occur throughout a particular match or the tournament as a whole. Popular prop bets in tennis often revolve around serving. The sportsbook could place an over/under on the number of aces by John Isner in his first-round match or the number of double faults from Nadal in his match. You can also wager on whether or not there will be a tiebreak. Prop betting can be a small, but fun way to bet and follow along with the tournament.

Live betting: Just like any other sport, sportsbooks will have live betting available during Wimbledon tennis matches. Based on the events in the match, the players’ live moneylines and set spreads will change and allow you to make bets while watching or following along.

Recent Wimbledon champions

A glance at men’s past winners with odds.

  • 2021: Novak Djokovic: -110
  • 2020: Canceled
  • 2019: Novak Djokovic +145
  • 2018: Novak Djokovic +600
  • 2017: Roger Federer +225
  • 2016: Andy Murray +330
  • 2015: Novak Djokovic +110

A glance at women’s past winners with odds.

  • 2021: Ashleigh Barty +400
  • 2020: Canceled
  • 2019: Simona Halep: +1800
  • 2018: Angelique Kerber +1200
  • 2017: Garbine Muguruza +1600
  • 2016: Serena Williams +160
  • 2015: Serena Williams +150

Wimbledon FAQ

Who is favored to win Wimbledon in 2022 (men/women)?

Novak Djokovic is favored to win the men’s Wimbledon title at +125 odds at BetMGM. Iga Swiatek is the women’s favorite at +400 odds at Caesars.

What are the payouts/prizes at Wimbledon?

The winners of the 2021 men’s and women’s singles tournament each received 1,845,000 pounds. The total purse of the tournament was approximately 35,000,000 pounds.

How do players qualify for Wimbledon?

Of the 128 players that make the singles main draw for Wimbledon, 104 of them will qualify as the top-ranked players in the world that are available to play. Sixteen of the remaining 24 spots are taken from players who make it through the Qualifying tournament held directly before the main tournament. The remaining eight spots are considered wild cards, which are handed out by the tournament’s committee to players for various reasons, including local stars, young stars, or veteran players.

Who has won Wimbledon the most times (men/women)?

Men’s: Roger Federer has won Wimbledon eight times.

Women’s: Martina Navratilova won Wimbledon nine times.

When does Wimbledon 2022 start?

Wimbledon starts on Monday, June 27.