US Open Betting Guide

Odds, Predictions and Event History

The 2019 US Open will be the 119th running of the event and comes to us from Pebble Beach Golf Links in California. It’s the sixth time the course has hosted a US Open but the first since 2010 when Graeme McDowell claimed his first (and only) major title.

This year, the US Open will play as the PGA Tour’s third Major under the new schedule format which saw the PGA Championship move up to mid-May. Coming off his win in that event, Brooks Koepka will also be playing for a third consecutive US Open title.

Tiger Woods, who won his fifth career green jacket at Augusta National in April’s Masters Tournament, looks to return to Major form after missing the cut at the PGA Championship. Woods won the 2000 US Open at Pebble Beach by 15 strokes at 12-under par. He can close to within two of Jack Nicklaus’ all-time record of 18 Major victories with his fourth career US Open title.

Phil Mickelson will try once again to win the one Major championship to elude him throughout his career and become just the sixth player in the Masters era to win the career grand slam. He set the stage with a victory at the AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am in February.

US Open golf odds 2019

US Open Winner

Game
06/13/2019
(Eastern Time)
(EST)
Dustin Johnson
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+700
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+900
Rory McIlroy
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+850
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+900
Brooks Koepka
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+950
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+900
Tiger Woods
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+1200
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+1100
Patrick Cantlay
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+2000
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+1900
Jordan Spieth
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+2100
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+1900
Rickie Fowler
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+2200
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+3100
Hideki Matsuyama
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+2800
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+3500
Justin Rose
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+2900
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+2700
Jon Rahm
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+2900
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+3300
Xander Schauffele
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+2900
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+2400
Tommy Fleetwood
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+3000
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+3200
Adam Scott
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+3000
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+3400
Webb Simpson
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+3000
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+4000
Justin Thomas
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+3300
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+2400
Matt Kuchar
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+3500
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+4400
Jason Day
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+3600
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+2900
Francesco Molinari
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+3600
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+3700
Paul Casey
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+4500
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+4900
Henrik Stenson
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+4500
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+6500
Phil Mickelson
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+5000
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+4600
Tony Finau
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+5500
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+4900

View odds for all players at DraftKings Sportsbook and FanDuel Sportsbook.

How to bet the US Open

The odds to win the 2019 US Open were generally released a few days or weeks following the previous year’s event and are altered throughout the year based on player performance, injury, or public opinion. It’s always a good idea to take a good look at the odds when they’re initially released in order to find some early value and place some wagers on longshots whose odds are likely to drop by the next year’s event.

Closer to the US Open, sportsbooks will release odds on top-5, top-10, and top-20 finishes. These require bettors to lay a little more juice, but these results can be much easier to predict based on a player’s past performance and course history. Typically a few days before the event, odds will be released for First Round Leader, 36-Hole Leader, and 54-Hole Leader. These results can be greatly affected by player tee times and the local weather, so be sure to take conditions in Pebble Beach into consideration.

A series of player and tournament props will also be released closer to the event pairing players with similar outright odds or world rankings, or tee times against each other for either the first two rounds or the tournament. Golfers from the same geographical region will also be grouped together.

ALSO READ: US Open Golf Betting Preview: Sleepers, Values, And A Pick To Win

Best US Open betting sites

US Open format

The US Open will have a field of 156 golfers tee off Thursday, June 13. The top 60 and ties at the conclusion of the second round will advance to play the weekend.

Should the event be tied after 72 holes, an 18-hole playoff will be held Monday, June 17. A sudden-death playoff then takes place should the tie persist through 90 holes. This most recently happened in 2008 when Woods defeated Rocco Mediate on the first hole of sudden-death.

Exemptions for the 2019 US Open are awarded based on the following merits:

  • Winners of the US Open the last 10 years.
  • Winners of the US Amateur, the US Junior Amateur, the US Mid-Amateur, and the runner-up of the US Amateur
  • Winner of the 2018 Amateur Championship conducted by the R&A
  • Winner of the 2018 Mark H. McCormack Medal (top-ranked Amateur in the world)
  • Winners of the Masters Tournament the last 5 years
  • Winners of the Open Championship the last 5 years
  • Winners of the PGA Championship 2014-19
  • Winners of The Players Championship the last 3 years
  • Winners of multiple full-point PGA Tour events from the 2018 US Open to the 2019 US Open
  • Winner of the 2018 US Senior Open
  • Qualifiers of the 2018 Tour Championship
  • Top 60 point leaders in the Official World Golf Ranking as of May 20, 2019
  • Top 60 point leaders in the OWGR as of June 10, 2019
  • Special exemptions as selected by the USGA

The remaining spots in the 156-player field after the second OWGR cut-off and final exemptions will be awarded to the best qualifiers to make it through both local and sectional qualifying stages.

The Local Qualifying stage consisted of 18 holes played at 110 courses in 43 US states and Canada from April 29 to May 13 and saw 500 of 8,602 competitors advance. All those competing had to have a USGA Handicap Index of 1.4 or lower to enter.

The Sectional Qualifying stage is played over 36 holes in one day at nine sites in the US and one in each of England, Japan, and Canada.

Twenty-one players advanced through local and sectional qualifying to earn a spot in the 2018 US Open at Shinnecock Hills. Seven of those made it through the cut.

How to watch the US Open

All four rounds of the 2019 US Open from Thursday, June 13, through Sunday, June 16, will be broadcast on FOX Sports and FOX Sports 1. It will also be streamed live on FOXSports.com and on the FOX Sports app.

US Open fun facts

  • Most wins: 4– Jack Nicklaus, Ben Hogan, Bobby Jones, and Willie Anderson. Tiger has a chance to join them with a win this year.
  • Youngest winner: John McDermott — 19 years, 9 months, 14 days (1911)
  • Youngest Qualifier: Andy Zhang — 14 years, six months (2012)
  • Oldest winner: Hale Irwin — 45 years, 15 days (1990)
  • Highest score on one hole: 19, Ray Ainsley (1938) on the par 4 16th at Cherry Hills Country Club in Englewood, Colo.
  • Best comeback: Arnold Palmer came back from down seven strokes entering the final round in 1960 to top a group including Nicklaus, Hogan, and Gary Player. It was his first and only US Open championship.
  • Amateur winners: Francis Ouimet (1913), Jerome D. Travers (1915), Charles Evans Jr. (1916), Bobby Jones (1923, 1926, 1929, 1939), John Goodman (1933)
  • Most times runner-up: Phil Mickelson (1999, 2002, 2004, 2006, 2009, 2013)

Biggest betting longshots in US Open history

Francis Ouimet (1913): Amateur

Just 20 years old and playing as an amateur, Ouimet outplayed accomplished British golfers Harry Vardon and Ted Ray to become the second American to win the US Open. Ouimet would go on to win the US Amateur in 1914 and 1931.

Michael Campbell (2005): No. 80 in OWGR

Hailing from Hawera, New Zealand, Campbell was a relative unknown on the PGA circuit prior to his 2005 victory at Pinehurst Resort. He finished T3 at The Open in 1995 but had never won on the PGA Tour and hadn’t played a PGA event in the 2005 season before his first, and only, win.

Lucas Glover (2009): No. 72 in OWGR

Glover rolled into the 2009 US Open at Bethpage Black two events removed from missing the cut at The Players Championship, finishing outside the top 40 at each of those follow-up tournaments. He missed the cut in three previous tries at the US Open and his previous best finish in a Major was a T20 at the 2007 Masters.

Graeme McDowell (2010): No. 36 in OWGR

McDowell entered the 2010 US Open at Pebble Beach just one week removed from a victory at The Celtic Manor Wales Open, but he had missed the cut at April’s Masters. Ranked No. 36 in the world, it’s more about who McDowell outplayed in the final round that makes him a longshot winner. He entered the day three strokes back of Dustin Johnson and just two up on reigning Pebble Beach-champ, Woods. With his main competitors shooting final round scores of 82 and 75, respectively, McDowell was able to coast in with a fourth-round 74 for a one-stroke victory over Gregory Havret.

us open golf
Graeme McDowell at the 2010 US Open

US Open FAQ

Who qualifies for golf’s US Open?

Anyone with a USGA Handicap Index of 1.4 or lower has a chance. They must make it through both local and sectional qualifying.

Where is the US Open this year?

Pebble Beach Golf Links in Pebble Beach, Calif.

Is Tiger Woods playing the US open?

Yes! Tiger will be trying to win his fourth US Open and second at Pebble Beach.

What are the highest and lowest scores to win the US open?

Koepka and Rory McIlroy share the honor for the lowest score ever to win a US Open at minus-16 in 2017 and 2011, respectively. Walter Hagen’s plus-17 in 1919 is the highest winning score of all time. Geoff Ogilvy and Angel Cabrera each shot plus-5 in 2006 and 2007 for the highest winning scores since 1975.

Winning scores at Pebble Beach have ranged from plus-2 to Tiger’s minus-12 in 2000.

What is the prize money for the US Open?

The 2019 US Open will match The Players Championship with a purse of $12.5 million. The winner will receive $2.25 million, also matching The Players.

Has anyone ever won back-to-back-to-back US Opens?

Brooks Koepka was the first since Curtis Strange in 1988-89 and seventh all-time to go back-to-back as US Open champion. He’ll have his chance to join Willie Anderson (1903-05) as the only players to win three straight.

How many US Opens has Pebble Beach hosted?

This will be the sixth US Open held at Pebble Beach with previous events coming in 1972, 1982, 1992, 2000, and 2010. It will next host the event in 2027.

How much are tickets to the US Open?

General gallery tickets start at $125 USD for Thursday’s opening round and increase to $145 for Friday. Weekend passes are sold out.

Tickets for Monday and Tuesday’s practice rounds are $60 and increase to $75 for Wednesday.