Which States Can I Bet Legally On College Football This Season?

Written By Brett Gibbons on August 22, 2022
Legal College Football Bet

College football odds are out, and the season is right around the corner. You login to place a bet on State University because they’re the hometown team and you bleed their colors. Their Week 1 spread against North Tech is a slam dunk bet. Scroll to NCAAF… State U vs. North Tech and… wait– where’s the line? Unfortunately, you learn, it’s not legal to bet on college football in every state.

In Massachusetts and New Jersey, you can bet on college sports as long as they aren’t located in your state. It’s not much a hindrance for these states in particular, but what about in Oregon where the Ducks are one of the biggest brands in the country? Or New York? Below, we’ll lay out where it’s legal to bet on college football this coming season.

Where It Is Legal To Bet On College Football

If you’re in most states with legal sports betting, chances are it’s OK to bet on college sports. It’s legal without particular restrictions in the following states:

Kansas and Ohio will join this list as soon as the states launch sports betting (the former TBA and the latter on Jan. 1). Louisiana’s sports betting laws differ from parish-to-parish, so as long as you’re located in a legal parish, you can bet on college sports.

Mississippi, Montana, Nebraska, and North Carolina allow betting on college football– including props– but you must place them at a retail book. Online sports betting is not legal in those states.

The following states allow mobile and online betting of college football, but don’t offer prop bets:

Tennessee and Virginia allow online betting on college football, but ban in-game prop betting. Prop betting before kickoff is authorized.

Where It Is Not Legal To Bet On All College Football

Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New Hampshire, New York, Washington D.C., and Wisconsin all allow betting on college football, as long as it’s not on an in-state team. Connecticut has one exception– you can place futures bets on in-state teams (a specific workaround for UConn in March Madness tournaments). Massachusetts allows betting on in-state schools only in tournaments.

D.C. also outlaws betting on college contests that take place inside District lines (even if either team is located in D.C.).

Oregon does not allow betting on college football of any kind. The state doesn’t house any professional football teams, but is home to both the Oregon Ducks and Oregon State Beavers. Bettors in Oregon are left with few options, considering no neighboring states have online legal sports betting. Their best option would be a trip to Montana, Colorado, or Nevada.

Of course, you can’t legally bet on college football in any state that hasn’t legalized sports betting. Major players on that list include Alabama, California, Georgia, and Texas.

Where It’s Complicated

Until recently, there was a total ban of betting on in-state colleges in Illinois. Currently, residents have to go to a retail book to wager on Illinois, Northwestern, and the other in-state teams, but prop betting is banned. Those regulations are set to expire on July 1, 2023 unless the state legislature decides to extend them.

New Mexico doesn’t have a sweeping ban on college football, but online betting is not legal in the state. Regulations differ between tribal casinos. North Carolina also restricts sports betting to in-person tribal casinos.

Where I Can Bet On College Football

StateLegal To Bet On College Football?Legal To Bet On College Props?
ArizonaYesNo
ArkansasYesYes
ColoradoYesNo
Connecticut%NoNo
DelawareNoNo
D.C.YesNo
Illinois^YesNo
IndianaYesNo
IowaYesNo
KansasYesYes
Louisiana%YesYes
MarylandYesYes
Massachusetts^YesNo
MichiganYesYes
Mississippi*YesYes
Montana*YesYes
Nebraska*YesYes
NevadaYesYes
New HampshireNoNo
New Jersey^YesNo
New Mexico%YesYes
New York^YesNo
North Carolina%YesYes
OhioYesYes
OregonNoNo
PennsylvaniaYesYes
Rhode IslandNoNo
South DakotaNoNo
Tennessee%YesNo
Virginia%YesNo
WashingtonNoNo
West VirginiaYesYes
WisconsinNoNo
WyomingYesYes
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Written by
Brett Gibbons

Brett is an avid sports traveler and former Division-I football recruiter for Bowling Green and Texas State. He’s a graduate of BGSU and works as an auditor for Google content curation products. He’s also contributed to Sports Illustrated and Fansided during his young writing career.

View all posts by Brett Gibbons