GeoComply Reveals How Often Those Without Legal Sportsbooks Tried To Bet On The Super Bowl

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Written By Giovanni Shorter | Last Updated
GeoComply Super Bowl

Super Bowl 58 was the most wagered-on event in history, with a record-setting $185.6 million in bets placed in Nevada alone. Many markets reaped the benefits of the influx of Super Bowl wagers. However, unregulated markets have missed out on potential millions in action. GeoComply released a breakdown showing how Super Bowl betting would have affected some unregulated markets.

Let’s break down the findings from GeoComply.

Biggest Super Bowl Loss Wasn’t The 49ers, But the Unregulated Markets

The appetite for legal online sports betting is strong and growing, according to GeoComply. Bettors in markets without local sportsbooks still attempted to wager at the best sports betting sites. Specifically, locals in Missouri, Georgia, Minnesota, Alabama, and Mississippi saw hundreds of thousands of attempts during the Big Game. Each of these markets has sports betting bills in the works.

What the GeoComply report shows is that locals are interested in betting markets. There is no doubt that fans want to bet. It all depends on what lawmakers do with that information.

Missouri

GeoComply reports more than 431,000 geolocation checks came in from mobile devices in Missouri. With the Chiefs in the Super Bowl, it is no surprise that bettors attempted to place action on their local team. More than 40,500 mobile betting accounts were identified in Missouri, a 30% increase year over year.

Over 48% of the geolocation checks attempted to access sportsbooks in Kansas. More than 37% of the geolocation checks attempted to access sportsbooks in Illinois.

Georgia

GeoComply reports more than 70,000 geolocation checks were made in Georgia, which is an 87% increase year over year. More than 11,000 mobile betting accounts were identified in Georgia, a 74% increase compared to last year’s Super Bowl. 33% of the geolocation checks were attempting to wager at Tennessee sportsbooks.

Minnesota

More than 31,000 geolocation checks were reported in Minnesota attempting to bet on the Super Bowl. This marks a 17% increase compared to last year’s Big Game. More than 4,000 mobile sports betting accounts were identified, a 29% jump year over year. 62% of the checks were attempting to wager at Iowa sportsbooks.

Alabama

GeoComply reports more than 35,000 geolocation checks were discovered in Alabama. This is a 78% increase in attempts compared to last year’s Super Bowl. More than 5,000 mobile sports betting accounts were identified in Alabama. This is an increase of more than 69%. GeoComply reveals that 53% of the checks were attempting to wager at Tennessee sportsbooks.

Mississippi

More than 120,000 geolocation checks have come from accounts attempting to wager in Mississippi. This represents a 52% increase from the previous Super Bowl weekend. GeoComply reveals that more than 10,000 mobile betting accounts were identified in Mississippi, a 69% increase year over year. More than 40% of the geolocation attempted wagering at Tennessee sportsbooks.

Will These Markets Have Sports Betting For Super Bowl 59?

Each of these markets sees sports betting legislation active in 2024. Alabama and Georgia are pushing bills for a constitutional amendment that would require a statewide vote. If they pass, they will be placed on the 2024 November ballot.

Even if the measures are voted on by residents, the markets will likely not launch in time for Super Bowl 58.

Mississippi, Missouri, and Minnesota are all pushing bills that would launch online sports betting through legislation. Each of the measures is in its earliest stages. The likelihood of these measures passing depends on whether lawmakers can agree.

Missouri, in particular, has been attempting sports betting in multiple sessions and has failed. Mississippi is already home to retail betting but has not managed to agree on online legislation.

Lawmakers will see the missed opportunity of not having betting available for Super Bowl 58. Will this sway them to push for legislation in time for next year’s Super Bowl? Only time will tell.

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