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December 26, 2018

NFL Week 17 Lines: Spreads, Totals And NJ Betting Guide

Marco Cerino December 26, 2018
Week 17 Lines

We’ve come to the end of the 2018 NFL regular season. As Santa wraps his journey across the world, the folks at the NFL offices in NYC are celebrating because they got what they wanted before they have to unwrap gifts: many relevant games on the last Sunday.

The league scheduling geniuses changed their structuring a few years ago to make this a division-rivals only week, hoping to make the matchups enticing to viewers whose teams might be out of the race. This year, they nailed it.

Here’s a look at the NFL Week 17 betting spreads and totals for the full slate of Sunday games at New Jersey sportsbooks.

(Odds updated 12/26/18)

 DraftKingsBetStarsFanDuel888sportSugarHouse
Atlanta
Tampa Bay
52
-1.5
51.5
PK
52
-1
52
-1.5
52
-1.5
Carolina
New Orleans

N/A
-9
Dallas
NY Giants
41.5
-6
42
-6
41.5
-6
41.5
-6
Detroit
Green Bay
45.5
-8
45
-8
45
-7.5
45.5
-8
45.5
-8
Jacksonville
Houston
40.5
-7
40.5
-7.5
40.5
-7.5
40.5
-7
40.5
-7
Miami
Buffalo
38.5
-3.5
38.5
-3.5
38.5
-3.5
38.5
-3.5
38.5
-3.5
NY Jets
New England
45.5
-13.5
45.5
-13.5
46
-13.5
45.5
-13.5
45.5
-13.5
Arizona
Seattle
N/A
-13.5
Chicago
Minnesota
40.5
-5
40.5
-5
41
-5
40.5
-5
40.5
-5
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
45.5
-14.5
45.5
-14.5
45.5
-14.5
45.5
-14.5
45.5
-14.5
Cleveland
Baltimore
40.5
-6.5
41
-6
41
-6.5
40.5
-6.5
40.5
-6.5
LA Chargers
Denver
-6.5
41.5
-6.5
41.5
-6.5
41.5
-6.5
41.5
Oakland
Kansas City
53.5
-13.5
54
-13.5
53.5
-13.5
53.5
-13.5
Philadelphia
Washington
-6.5
42
-6.5
42
-6.5
41.5
-6.5
42
-6.5
42
San Francisco
LA Rams
49.5
-9.5
50
-10
49.5
-9.5
49.5
-9.5
Indianapolis
Tennessee
-3
N/A
-3
N/A
-3
N/A
-3
N/A

Week 17 betting breakdown

Falcons at Buccaneers (-1.5): This will be an interesting line to watch as the week goes. Could this be Jameis Winston’s last game in Tampa? He’s lost the last three to Atlanta, including the last two at home. Books are offering value in this one so shop around for the best prices for your position.

Panthers at Saints: New Orleans clinched home field throughout the playoffs with their win against the Steelers. The Saints have won the last two meetings at the Superdome, including last year’s Wild Card win. Carolina won’t participate in this year’s playoffs. Books might be waiting on who’ll play to set prices.

Lions at Packers (-7.5): Both teams conclude disappointing years out of the playoff hunt. Detroit could make it four wins in a row over Green Bay for the first time since the season sweeps in 1982 and ‘83. The oddsmakers were in virtual agreement on the spread and total as of Wednesday morning.

Jaguars at Texans (-7): Houston needs a win to clinch the AFC South, which has been the case for a few weeks now. They can also move to a bye week if things go right in other games. They enter 6-2 against Jacksonville at home in the last eight meetings.

Dolphins at Bills (-3.5): Miami lost its playoff eligibility at home to Jacksonville. Now the Dolphins must finish the season in cold Buffalo. Ouch.

Patriots (-13.5) at Jets: New England can clinch the #2 seed with a win and potentially snatch home field advantage. A loss might mean they host Wild Card Weekend. The Jets haven’t beaten their division rivals since 2015.

Cowboys at Giants (-6.5): Dallas has locked up its second division in three years for the first time since their dominance in the 90s. Will the Giants rally behind Eli in a meaningless home finale?

Browns at Ravens (-6): Lamar Jackson has put Baltimore into a win-and-in game to lock up the AFC North. Mind you, this didn’t work last year against the Bengals. They’ll face an improved Cleveland team to clinch the 4 seed.

Bengals at Steelers (-15): Pittsburgh needs a win and a Ravens loss to stay AFC North champs. Otherwise, they’ll miss the playoffs unless they win and the Titans and Colts tie on Sunday night. The Steelers are 4-1 in the last five at home against Cincinnati.

Raiders at Chiefs (-13.5): KC still hasn’t clinched the AFC West or a specific seed. A win means the Chiefs take home field advantage for the AFC bracket. The Raiders’ win on Christmas Eve (their final game in Oakland?) cost them their shot at the #1 overall draft pick. Andy Reid has won all five games at home against the team’s most historic rival.

Chargers at Broncos (-6.5): Los Angeles can either stay in the wild card or, with a win and Chiefs loss, put the path to the Super Bowl through their cozy stadium in Carson. To do so, they’ll have to win in Denver for the first time since 2013. Not many books have offered totals on this game yet so keep an eye out for value.

Bears at Vikings (-5): Chicago has won the NFC North and could leapfrog the Rams for the #2 seed with a win and LA loss. Minnesota can clinch the last wild card spot with a win. They haven’t lost hosting Chicago since 2012.

Eagles (-6.5) at Redskins: Two wins from St. Nick (Foles) has Philly talking repeat, while Washington saw its playoffs dashed with last week’s loss to Tennessee. Should the Eagles win and Vikings lose, Philadelphia gets the last wild card spot. Foles won two starts in his first stint with the Eagles against their division rivals but hasn’t won at FedEx Field.

49ers at Rams: Los Angeles just needs a win to lock up the #2 seed and a bye week for the playoffs. San Fran has won both matchups since the Rams moved to SoCal.

Cardinals at Seahawks: The win against KC last week qualified Seattle for the wild card. However, this game still has massive implications: Should Arizona lose, they’ll secure the #1 pick in the 2019 draft. The Seahawks haven’t beaten the Cards in Seattle since 2014.

Colts (-3) at Titans: This is a win-or-go-home game for both teams. The Texans result will determine if they’ll play for the division or final wild card spot. Indy has won five of the last six in Nashville. Look for more prices once it’s confirmed who’s starting under center for Tennessee.

Five States Expected To Make Big Sports Betting Moves In 2019

Juan Carlos Blanco December 26, 2018
Sports Betting 2019

Few embrace the “there’s no minute like the last minute” concept better than state legislatures.

Often, a flurry of bills will pass when the urgency of a legislative session’s end presses the point for lawmakers. As it relates to sports betting, the most recent example just unfolded in Michigan. Wolverine State legislators overwhelmingly approved House Bill 4926, the Lawful Internet Gaming Act, in the wee hours of Dec. 21. The legislation passed the state’s Senate by a 33-5 margin and then cleared the hurdle in the House, 71-35. The bill now sits on Gov. Rick Snyder’s desk for signature.

Despite the monumental progress, the full implementation of Michigan online gaming isn’t likely before 2020. But several states are not only expected to legalize sports betting in 2019 but could potentially launch a legal market in time for football season.

Plenty in the wings for 2019

In the wake of 10 states now either having active regulated sports betting markets or in preparation for such following the passage of legislation, five more have already placed themselves in the on-deck circle for 2019 by pre-filing bills. The outlook for each is as follows:

Kentucky

There are currently three pre-filed bills ahead of the 2019 legislative session: BR 15, BR 29 and BR 320. That’s indicative of what’s expected to be a legitimately serious push for legalization of various forms gaming in the Bluegrass State in the coming year. Notably, BR 15 calls for the Kentucky Lottery Corporation to establish a sports wagering regulatory infrastructure.

The groundwork was laid during the last few months with the creation of an unofficial panel intended to study the issue. Then, lawmakers heard from various stakeholders in October regarding various pertinent components of any future gaming legislation: tax rates, integrity monitoring and mobile wagering among them.

The most recent development in Kentucky is particularly interesting. State Attorney General Andy Beshear, publicly threw his support behind the idea of legislators passing an expansive gaming bill in 2019 that would encompass not just sports betting, but daily fantasy sports, casinos and online poker as well. The impetus for Beshear’s stance is relatively straightforward — much-needed revenue for the state coffers, including an estimated $30 million annually from sports betting that would help fully fund the state’s pension systems.

Missouri

The Show Me State seems intent on showing it can get comprehensive sports betting legislation passed in 2019. But what form that will take is still very much in the air, considering there are two slightly different pre-filed bills.

Sen. Denny Hoskins’ (R-MO) piece of proposed legislation, SB 44, includes a 1 percent royalty or integrity fee, but with half of it earmarked toward an Entertainment Facilities Infrastructure Fund that would be used for the upkeep of sports or cultural facilities within Missouri. The bill sets a tax on adjusted sports betting gross revenue at 6.25 percent. A $5,000 annual administrative fee and $10,000 “reinvestigation fee” that sounds more ominous than intended would also apply. The latter would go into a fund that would eventually mature every fifth year when the licensee is re-vetted.

Then, Representative Cody Smith stepped into the picture with his pre-filed bill, HB 119, in early December.

Smith’s bill does include a 1 percent integrity fee, although there’s a tweak with that aspect in his legislation as well — 75 percent is paid to registered professional sports leagues, while 25 percent would be paid to the NCAA on wagers that involve major college teams. The bill would include a $10,000 application fee and $5,000 annual renewal fee for “interactive gaming licenses,” aka on-site mobile wagering. Traditional brick-and-mortar licenses would also be subject to a $10,000 application fee.

Notably, under the terms of Smith’s proposal, gaming operators would be required to use official data from the sports leagues if the ”sports governing bodies” informed the operators they wanted them to do so — a veritable slam dunk.

Ohio

One of two current placeholder bills, S 316was filed in July by the bipartisan duo of Sens. John Eklund and Sean O’Brien. Another, H 714, also sits at the ready for potential deliberation once the 2019 legislative session kicks off.

The Buckeye State has a total of 11 land-based and racetrack casinos. One of its lawmakers, Sen. Bill Coley, notably advocated for interstate sports betting compacts that would include data sharing between jurisdictions at a U.S. Sports Betting Policy Summit in Washington, D.C. in November. That concept is deemed too ambitious by many at the moment, especially given recent rumblings about a forthcoming revised legal opinion on the reach of the Wire Act.

Tennessee

Any legalization of gambling in the Volunteer State must happen via voter referendum. Accordingly, two pre-filed bills that would call for a measure to legalize sports betting be put to voters — HB 0001 and companion SB 0016 — have been pre-filed.

As per the introductory text of the proposed legislation, sports betting would have to be approved by voters on a county-by-county basis and there would be a 10 percent tax on sports betting revenue. A total of 40 percent of that allotment would be allocated for general appropriations. Another 30 percent would go toward to “state colleges of applied technologies and community colleges for equipment and capital projects.” Finally, 30 percent would go toward local governments where sports betting is approved and would fund education and infrastructure in those jurisdictions.

The Tennessee Gaming Commission would serve as the regulatory body.

Virginia

Virginia appears to be a potentially serious player on the sports betting front for 2019. The latest news coming out of the state involves an online-only sports betting bill pre-filed for next year’s legislative session by Delegate Mark Sickles. The proposed legislation, House Bill 1638 would repeal Virginia’s current ban on both sports betting and online lottery ticket sales.

The novelty of the bill stems from the fact it does not address the establishment of a brick-and-mortar sports betting market within the state whatsoever (Virginia does not have any casinos, tribal or commercial). Instead, it aims to legalize and regulate sports betting “platforms” that are better defined as a “website, app, or other platform accessible via the Internet or mobile, wireless, or similar communications technology that sports bettors use to place sports bets.”

Details of the bill as it pertains to sports betting include: The state’s lottery serving as the overseer of implementation and ongoing regulation; five sports betting licenses being made available at an initial cost of $250,000 each; sports betting revenue being taxed at 15 percent, with 2.5 percent of it going to the lottery for administrative fees.

Notably, Delegate Marcus Simon also spoke of introducing his own sports betting bill early in the 2019 legislative session that would aim to legalize the activity by July of next year. When he spoke of the potential legislation in October, Simon alluded to racetracks and off-track betting parlors as potential sites for brick-and-mortar sportsbooks.

Be sure to follow TheLines for the latest sports betting updates in your state in 2019!